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Boccia

Come play Boccia!

Practice Every other Tuesday, from 10:00-12:00pm

Held at:  Brush Creek Community Center 3801 Emanuel Cleaver II Blvd, Kansas City, MO 64130

Participants will need to complete a waiver to participate.  Waiver can be completed here.


If you are interested in playing Boccia, or other adaptive sports and recreation activities, contact Kate Hwang, at adaptivesports@thewholeperson.org.


All you need to know about Boccia

Sport Explained: Boccia | Paralympic Games

Boccia is a paralympic sport solely for wheelchair users and is very similar to bocce ball or curling. Players are on one side of the court and propel blue or red balls toward the white ball, which is known as The Jack. Games can be played 1 on 1, 2 on 2, or 3 on 3. The great thing about boccia is that anyone who is in a wheelchair can play. Athletes can propel the ball with their hands, feet or even push it off a ramp using a pointer on their head or in their mouth. No matter the athlete’s range of motion, trunk control or grip strength, anyone can play!

Boccia practice is open to anyone with a mobility disability. Athletes will compete seated. No fee, no commitment.

Sport Classes - For competition purposes, athletes are classified into one of four classes:

  1. BC1 - Players in this class throw the ball with the hand or foot. They may compete with an assistant who stays outside of the competitor’s playing box, to stabilize or adjust their playing chair and give the ball to the player when requested.
  2. BC2 - Players in this class throw the ball with the hand. They are not eligible for assistance.
  3. BC3 - Players in this class have very severe locomotor dysfunction in all four extremities. Players in this class have no sustained grasp or release action and although they may have arm movement, they have insufficient range of movement to propel a Boccia ball onto the court. They may use an assistive device such as a ramp to deliver the ball. They may compete with an assistant; assistants must keep their back to the court and their eyes averted from play.
  4. BC4 - Players in this class have severe locomotor dysfunction of all four extremities as well as poor trunk control. They can demonstrate sufficient dexterity to throw the ball onto the court. Players are not eligible for assistance.